The Peloponnesian War, Stupidity, and Imperialism

[Part of an occasional series of free books based on previously published essays by yours truly. You can find all other free downloads here.]

The book you are about to read is concerned with one of the most fascinating episodes in the history of ancient Greece, featuring larger-than-life characters like Socrates, Pericles, Alcibiades, Brasidas, and, of course, Thucydides, who told the story for posterity. We have much to learn, even today, from a deep dive into the history of that war that forever reshaped the Mediterranean world and led to the destruction not just of Athens, but of the entire Hellas, paving the way for the conquest of Alexander the Great. As the title of this book anticipates, it is a story of imperialism and stupidity on both sides. But it’s also a very human story of bravery and resilience. (download E-pub here)

Published by

Massimo

Massimo is the K.D. Irani Professor of Philosophy at the City College of New York. He blogs at platofootnote.org and howtobeastoic.org. He is the author of How to Be a Stoic: Using Ancient Philosophy to Live a Modern Life.

One thought on “The Peloponnesian War, Stupidity, and Imperialism”

  1. There’s an alt-history angle here, too. Socrates could have been killed in battle early in the war at Delium. Story is in either “What If” or “What If 2” books of alt-history essays. Socrates dying that early means no Plato as we know him; maybe some form of Plato, but not as we know him. Likely no Aristotle at all.

    Liked by 1 person

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